Time-Shifting Apps Can Improve Lives

What if you could live in the moment while your apps worked in the background for you?

With the advent of thousands of applications invading our lives, and in the process, striving to provide utility to our daily actions — somehow, somewhere we’re missing the point.

Examples

Yesterday, I was conversing with a colleague who loves to buy tech stuff from online portals. He recommended to me about a buying and selling platform. I took my phone out, searched for the platform on my favorite search engine, waited a while to get the results, then I visited the relevant result which led to an averagely formatted website for my smartphone.

Today, I was talking with a friend and we were discussing our usual stuff, in which we bring about topics of the apps and ideas that work in this age. He made a mention of the book named Selfish by Kim Kardashian. I took my phone out, searched for the book on my favorite search engine, waited a while to get the results, then I visited the relevant result which led to an averagely formatted website for my smartphone.

The Issues

By habit and by convention, technology has started invading and distracting us. While it is useful to have the information at our finger-tips, somehow the process is absurdly distracting and lengthy. Search engines and websites are still slower on smartphones. Also to mention, not all of them are well-formatted for the devices. Apart from being slow and lengthy, the process is out of context — It makes us leave what we’re currently doing, and takes us to a different path altogether that could essentially just wait.

What would be awesome is to have an app where I could type down my ideas on my phone so very quickly, and when I am at my leisure on my computer, it would intelligently pop out with most relevant links and summary. This allows me to keep doing what I was doing when the idea popped. This also allows me to spend adequately appropriate energy in understanding the idea by dedicating myself to it.

Most of the conventional repetitive processes that sway us away from the primary context, really miss the point.

So why can’t we just take a note and do the search when on the desktop computer?

Of course, we can. We can copy the idea to a note-making app and save it. We can then, when we remember to, open it on our desktop computer, copy the phrases, type it in the search engine, video streaming platforms, social websites or so, and get the results. When the results are shown, we navigate from link to link as per our judgement, and carry on.

Does this not sound repetitive? Repetition can be automated. Does this sound too complex to adapt to? Sure.

So what are time-shifting apps?

Time-shifting apps would ideally record ideas and instructions and let you be yourself thereon. In the background, they would use all the intelligent tools around, including social apps, geolocation apps, search engines, your address book, your emails and a lot of digital mediums. They would work in the background for you to automate as closely as possible, your repetitive research-oriented tasks and keep your summarized results ready for you. They would pop you to get back to those results when you’re ready for them.

So the next time you’re conversing about something, you can go till the end without getting distracted.